Category Archives: Blog

  • 0

Duct Sealing Info From Energy Star

In houses with forced-air heating and cooling systems, ducts are used to distribute conditioned air throughout the house. In a typical house, however, about 20 to 30 percent of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes, and poorly connected ducts. The result is higher utility bills and difficulty keeping the house comfortable, no matter how the thermostat is set.

How do you know that your home has poorly performing ducts?

  • you have high summer and winter utility bills;
  • you have rooms that are difficult to heat and cool;
  • you have stuffy rooms that never seem to feel comfortable;
  • your ducts are located in an attic, crawlspace, or the garage;
  • you find tangled or kinked flexible ducts in your system.

Benefits of Duct Sealing

A duct system that is well-designed and properly sealed can make your home more comfortable, energy efficient, and safer.

Learn more about the Benefits of Duct Sealing.

Simple Steps to Improving Duct Performance

Because ducts are often concealed in walls, ceiling, attics, and basements, repairing them can be difficult. But there are things that you can do to improve duct performance in your house.

Some homeowners choose to take on duct sealing as a do-it-yourself project. Start by sealing air leaks using mastic sealant or metal tape and insulating all the ducts that you can access (such as those in attics, crawlspaces, unfinished basements, and garages). Never use duct tape, as it is not long-lasting. Also, make sure that the connections at vents and registers are well-sealed where they meet the floors, walls, and ceiling. These are common locations to find leaks and disconnected ductwork.

Many homeowners choose to work with a professional contractor for duct improvement projects. Most heating and cooling equipment contractors also repair ductwork.

Pleasant Air is pleased to announce a revolutionary duct sealing application called Aeroseal. By injecting an aerosol product into the duct work, we are able to seal 90 to 95% of all leaks. This includes the ones that you can’t see and are not accessible otherwise.

Energy Star has recognized the Aeroseal application as one of the most cost effective energy savers to come along this century.

We have sealed over a hundred duct work systems to date, each one showing excellent results. For information on how it works click here.


  • 0

What Is A Seer Rating In Air Conditioning

Energy saving at it’s best.

When it comes to air conditioning what does SEER mean?

SEER is an acronym for Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio which is defined by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute in its standard ARI 210/240, Performance Rating of Unitary Air-Conditioning and Air-Source Heat Pump as the total heat removed from the conditioned space during the annual cooling season, expressed in Btu’s, divided by the total electrical energy consumed by the air conditioner or heat pump during the same season, expressed in watt-hours.

SEER rating more accurately reflects overall system efficiency on a seasonal basis and EER reflects the system?s energy efficiency at peak day operations. Both ratings are important when choosing a product. Heat Seasonal Performance Factor (HSPF) is the most commonly used measure of a heat pumps heating efficiency. A rating of 8 HSPF is considered high efficiency.

The Bottom Line is this; the higher the unit’s SEER and HSPF ratings the more energy efficient it is.

Thinking about a new unit or system? Contact us today to schedule a time for your complimentary estimate.
910.270.3934


  • 0

Pleasant Air Welcomes Jimmy Wesolek To The Energy Services Team

Jimmy Wesolek is now part of the Energy Services department.

Jimmy is a lifelong veteran in the hvac industry and brings with him a wealth of experience in home comfort and energy savings. He recently celebrated his 21st year with Pleasant Air. He has served as an installer and a service technician.

He joins the Energy Services team as a consultant and will be focusing on the very important and sometimes forgotten area of a Heating & Cooling system, which is your duct work. The Department of Energy and Energy Star has stated per their research that the majority of duct work systems 10 years and older have about a 20% air leakage which translates into higher energy usage. We have found this to be very true.

Pleasant Air is pleased to introduce a very cost effective solution to address this area of concern that will significantly reduce your energy usage.

It is called Aeroseal. – Please click here to view an informational video.

Duke Energy Progress currently offers its customers up to a $190.00 rebate for this revolutionary duct sealing application called Aeroseal. We do all the paperwork for you and Duke Energy Progress will then mail a rebate directly to you.
**A certificate showing before and after application results is printed out on site.**
**Per testing by Berkely Labs of California, the Aeroseal application has a life expectancy of 45 years.**

To date we have performed several applications. Each has shown excellent results.

You may call us at 910.270.3934 or reach us through our contact page to schedule your complimentary ductwork inspection.

Your inspection includes the following:

  • Visual inspection of your duct work system and the area it serves.
  • Measure the air flow at each register. (We use an ABM-200 Airflow & Environmental Meter for our tests.)
  • Measure the temperature at each register.
  • Scan the duct work with an infrared monitor.
  • Inserting a video camera into the duct work. (When appropriate)
  • Entering all measurements into a computer program.
  • Please allow about an hour for this inspection.

If you have areas of your house that are hotter or colder than others, have excess dust or would simply like to lower your energy bills, give us a call today for a free consultation with Jimmy.


  • 0

Ultraviolet Light Equipment: Do You Need It?

Ultraviolet Light Treatment Equipment

For years, UV light treatment equipment has been used, and is sometimes mandatory, in health care facilities, commercial buildings, hotels, schools, daycare centers and food processing plants. Today it is becoming even more common in the home to sterilize and neutralize airborne bacteria, molds, dust mites and odors.

While independent research has not been done on the technology’s effectiveness to reduce airborne bacteria and allergens in the home, a 2003 study published in The Lancet medical journal found ultraviolet light purifiers used in three office buildings reduced overall worker sickness by about 20 percent, including a 40 percent drop in breathing problems. The ultraviolet lamps were aimed at the cooling coils and drip pans in the ventilation systems of the buildings. The lights were turned on for four weeks; then turned off for 12 weeks. The cycle was repeated three times for almost a year. The use of the lights resulted in a 99-percent reduction of the concentration of germs on irradiated surfaces within the ventilation systems.

How It Works

Installed in the main supply or return duct of an air-source heat pump or air conditioning system, UV lights disinfect the air stream as it passes through the HVAC system. The lights usually operate continuously 24 hours a day, but only require between 15 Watts to 85 Watts depending on the system.

UV lights do not typically disinfect the air flowing through your ducts in just one pass, but your home’s air re-circulates more than 50 times a day during normal operation of a heat pump or air conditioning system, and with every pass more and more contaminants are destroyed. Contact us to schedule a complimentary inspection to see if you could benefit from a UV light.


  • 0

What Is A Ductless Mini-Split System

Installation and Maintenance

Ductless mini-split systems are easy and quick to install. They can be
operational within hours. All we need to do is set up
the outdoor condenser coil and compressor, drill a small hole for
the copper tubing, hang the indoor fan coil units, connect the tubing
and electrical power lines, install the wall controller, and the job is done.

System Controls

Wall-mounted thermostat or infrared remote control systems allow the

user to select the required functions such as temperature and fan speed

simply by pushing buttons. The user can even select a delayed start and

stop time for unit operation, which makes it possible to have a unit switched

on automatically before the homeowner arrives home from work.

ductless mini-split system

Design

The indoor unit of a ductless system is lightweight and comes in a variety of shapes and sizes to fit any design scheme. Outdoor units are designed to be efficient and durable, and they are smaller than conventional units, which makes them easier to disguise behind existing landscaping.

How it Works

To cool your home, refrigerant is pumped from the

outdoor condenser coil and compressor through

the copper tubing to the indoor unit or units.

Inside, the refrigerant is drawn across the evaporator coil and humidity

is removed and the air is cooled. A fan in the indoor unit then pushes the cooled air

into the room. The amount of cold air entering the room can be controlled by a

thermostat or it can be regulated by an infra-red remote controller, similar to a

television remote controller.

Contact us to schedule a complimentary appointment to see if a ductless mini-split is

the right choice for you.


  • 0

Heat Pumps: How Do They Work?

Air Source Heat Pumps

Cooling

To cool your home, the heat pump transfers heat from the air inside the home to the outside air. To perform this function, a heat pump works like a central air conditioning system. It has three main components: a compressor, a condenser and an evaporator coil. These parts are responsible for converting the working chemical known as a refrigerant from a gas to a liquid and back again. The indoor unit, which contains the evaporator coil, removes undesirable indoor warmth and humidity from the air. The outdoor unit, which contains the condenser and compressor, rejects the heat that was captured indoors.

The cycle of cooling begins when the refrigerant arrives at the compressor as a cool, low-pressure gas. The compressor squeezes the refrigerant and packs the molecule of the refrigerant closer together causing them to increase in temperature. The refrigerant leaves the compressor as a hot, high-pressure gas and flows into the condenser. In the condensing coil, the refrigerant releases its heat. A fan draws outdoor air in through louvers surrounding the outdoor cabinet and blows air across the hot coil. As the air blows across the coil, it transfers the heat to the outside air and cools the refrigerant inside the coil.

When the refrigerant leaves the condenser coil, its temperature is much cooler and it has changed from a gas to a liquid. The refrigerant then flows indoors through tubing and passes through a small opening in the expansion valve. In this valve, the refrigerant expands and the liquid’s pressure drops and becomes a low-temperature, low-pressure liquid that flows into the evaporator coil where it evaporates absorbing heat from the return air blown over the indoor coil by a fan. At the same time, moisture in the air is removed as it condenses on the indoor coil. Humidity removed from the air, as it makes contact with the indoor coil, is collected in a pan at the bottom of the coil and flows to a drain.

Refrigerant leaving the evaporator then returns to the compressor and the cycle continues. When the room reaches the temperature set on the thermostat, the air conditioner turns off. As the room warms up, the thermostat turns the air conditioner back on.

Heating

When an air-source heat pump is heating your home, the cooling cycle is reversed. In the outdoor unit, the heat pump evaporates a low temperature refrigerant. As the liquid evaporates, it absorbs heat from the outside air. A heat pump can do this because heat exists in all air down to absolute zero (-460 F or -273 c). Even cold winter air contains heat.

After the gas is compressed in the outdoor unit’s compressor, it passes into the indoor coil and condenses, releasing heat to the inside of the house. The pressure changes caused by the compressor and the expansion valve allow the gas to evaporate at a low temperature outside and condense at a higher temperature indoors.

Types of Air-source Heat Pumps

Most central heat pumps are split-systems, which means they have an indoor unit and an outdoor unit. Some heat pumps are packaged systems, which means they usually have the compressor, condenser, evaporator coil and the fan located outdoors in a single cabinet.


  • 0

  • 0

  • 0

Com-batting Allergies With Ultraviolet Light Treatment In Ductwork Systems

IAQ_HarvardStudy

Suffering from allergies? Read on: For years, UV light treatment equipment has been used, and is sometimes mandatory, in health care facilities, commercial buildings, hotels, schools, daycare centers and food processing plants. Today it is becoming even more common in the home to sterilize and neutralize airborne bacteria, molds, dust mites and odors.

While independent research has not been done on the technology’s effectiveness to reduce airborne bacteria and allergens in the home, a 2003 study published in The Lancet medical journal found ultraviolet light purifiers used in three office buildings reduced overall worker sickness by about 20 percent, including a 40 percent drop in breathing problems. The ultraviolet lamps were aimed at the cooling coils and drip pans in the ventilation systems of the buildings. The lights were turned on for four weeks; then turned off for 12 weeks. The cycle was repeated three times for almost a year. The use of the lights resulted in a 99-percent reduction of the concentration of germs on irradiated surfaces within the ventilation systems.


How It Works

Installed in the main supply or return duct of an air-source heat pump or air conditioning system, UV lights disinfect the air stream as it passes through the HVAC system. The lights usually operate continuously 24 hours a day, but only require between 15 Watts to 85 Watts depending on the system.

UV lights do not typically disinfect the air flowing through your ducts in just one pass, but your home’s air re-circulates more than 50 times a day during normal operation of a heat pump or air conditioning system, and with every pass more and more contaminants are destroyed.

Another important area of concern with regard to breathing healthier indoor air is the infiltration of these spores and allergens being drawn into your ductwork from unconditioned areas like attics and crawl spaces.

If you are feeling “icky-poo” more often than not, it might be time to contact us for an in house survey and evaluation. As a professional service to our residential customers, there is never a fee for our survey, consultation or estimate (should one be appropriate).

 


  • 0